VIEW CONFERENCE ANNOUNCES VIEW AWARDS 2021 WINNERS FOR SHORT ANIMATED FILMS

GRAND PRIZE
Les Chaussures de Louis (Louis’ Shoes)

JURY AWARDS Ex Aequo
Les Larmes de la Seine (The Seine’s Tears)
Yallah

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Ex Aequo:
Only a Child
Cat and Moth

Italian mix: Lucerna

‘I am so proud to announce the 2021 VIEW AWARD winners this year and to recognize the incredible students and professionals who created these outstanding films,” says VIEW Conference Director Maria Elena Gutierrez. “In addition to being works of art, four of our award winners send strong messages: An intimate look at autism, a reminder of the horrifying result of a street protest, an imaginative antidote to war, and a call to action from a child. The fifth winner is pure animation joy. Congratulations to all.”

GRAND PRIZE
Les Chaussures de Louis (Louis’Shoes), a 5:17minute 3D animated film.
In the jury’s unanimous choice for the 2021 VIEW Award, we meet Louis, an eight-and-a-half-year-old autistic child, who introduces himself to his classmates in a new school. We don’t look at Louis from the outside; we enter Louis’ mind as he shares the particular way in which he sees the world. The jurors found the film staggeringly humanizing, fresh, innovative, and entertaining all the way through. “Louis’ Shoes” brings light to an important topic and gives an autistic child a voice through brilliant animation, beautiful design, and a heartwarming story. It is a film, the jurors said, that works on every level. Congratulations to Marion Philippe, Kayu Leung, Jean-GéraudBlanc, and Théo Jamin of MoPA in Arles, France, who created this film during their graduation year.

JURY AWARDS Ex Aequo
The two jury award winners depict events in recent history set in two different locations. Through skillful storytelling and animation, they help audiences feel empathy for people caught in those dangerous places and times.

Les Larmes de la Seine (The Seine’s Tears), an 8:42 3D animated film
Paris 17 October 1961. 30,000 “Algerian workers” took to the streets to protest a mandatory curfew. The number of people massacred by police and thrown into the river that night is still unclear. In this remarkable student film, we follow two friends who join the demonstration. Viewers experience the friends’ determination, confusion, and terror in this frightening story. The consistent beautiful craftsmanship, great design and animation, and interesting camera point of view give the animated film power beyond a film of the actual horrific event. Congratulations to the eight directors who devoted time and attention to creating this strong film during their fifth year at the Pôle 3D school in Roubaix, France: Yanis Belaid, Eliott Benard, Nicolas Mayeur, Etienne Moulin, Hadrien Pinot, Philippine Singer, Alice Letailleus.

Yallah, a 7:04 minute 3D animated film
Beirut 1982. Nicolas, a middle-aged man, tries to flee the endless civil war by driving through the ruins of the city. He’s stopped by Naji, a reckless teenager wearing swimming trunks and goggles. Nicholas wants to protect Naji from the explosions and flying bullets. Naji wants to find a swimming pool. The story becomes one of perseverance, survival, and imagination; the story of a man inspired by a child in a world of war. It reminds us that a destroyed city was once beautiful. The jurors were enchanted by the use of comedy to tell a serious story, the great art direction, the stunning color-filled style, the camera, and the lighting. Yallah is a graduation short animated film created by Nayla Nassar, Edouard Pitula, Renaud de Saint Albin, Cécile Adant, Anaïs Sassatelli, and Candice Behague inthe class of 2021 at the RUBIKA School in Valenciennes, France.

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Ex Aequo
Only a Child, a 7-minute film created with various animation styles.
In 1992, Severn Cullis-Suzuki spoke for the Environmental Children’s Organization at the UN summit in Rio de Janeiro giving a call to action for the future of our planet with her plea that we need to come together. For this film, Simone Giampaolo, a London-based director, and animator brought together more than 20 animators. He asked each to speak Suzuki’s words from a portion of her speech and illustrate the words using their particular animation technique. Then, he choreographed a beautiful visual poem, a collaborative film that features moments of stunning animation.

Cat and Moth, a 7:20 minute 3D and 2D animated film
For her directorial debut, Vancouver-based animator India Barnardo took an overused plot in animation and surprised the jury with so many inspired moments of absolute brilliance they could not let it go unnoticed. The jury called it a good giggle, fresh, well-timed, charming, fun, original, and truly enjoyable. A 90-plus crew from around the world helped Barnardo achieve her vision.

ItalianMix: Lucerna – directed by Giorgia Ubaldi, Emilia Gozzano, Alessandra Quaroni, and Alessandro Spedicato

The nine-member international jury members included: Journalist Barbara Robertson, Jury Chair; VIEW Conference director Maria Elena Gutierrez, Jury President; Terry Flores, Variety senior editor; Anita Gribble, Escape head of industry outreach; Kim White, Pixar director of photography; Glenn Entis, PDI co-founder; David de Rooij, Netflix filmmaker, and storyboard artist; and Turin University student Davide de Rosa.

The international VIEW Conference, Italy’s premiere event for Computer Graphics, Interactive and Immersive Storytelling, Animation, Visual Effects, Games, VR, AR, and Mixed Reality, brings top professionals from those fields to the beautiful baroque city of Torino, Italy for a week of talks, presentations, and workshops. The 2022 VIEW Conference will take place from October 16 to 21 in Torino’s state-of-the-art OGR venue and virtually.

The VIEW Conference 2021 online edition is now available on-demand. Purchase tickets here:
https://media.viewconference.it/view2021/ On-demand ticket holders can view the VIEW 2021 Animated Short Film Award winners online.

For more information:

https://www.viewconference.it

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